Annemarie Torcivia - RE/MAX  Trinity



Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 2/17/2020

Selling a home may seem exceedingly difficult, particularly for those who are adding a residence to the housing market for the first time. Fortunately, there are many quick, easy ways to streamline the home selling process.

Now, let's take a look at three tips that you can use to become an expert home seller.

1. Examine Housing Market Trends

The current state of the real estate market may play an important role in your ability to maximize the value of your residence.

For example, a buyer's market may feature a shortage of property buyers. When this happens, home sellers may compete against one another for property buyers' attention more than ever before, leading to below-average home prices.

It is essential to consider how a seller's market works too.

In a seller's market, there is a shortage of home sellers. This means you may be in a great position to optimize the value of your residence, particularly if you have maintained a high-quality property. In fact, you may wind up receiving multiple offers on your home as soon as it reaches a seller's market.

To find out whether you're operating in a buyer's or seller's market, you'll need to study the real estate sector closely.

Look at the prices of recently sold homes and find out how long these properties were available before they were purchased. Also, you should check out the prices of comparable homes that are currently available to find out how your house stacks up against the competition.

2. Consider the Homebuyer's Perspective

How will a homebuyer feel when he or she sees your residence for the first time? Ultimately, the first impression may dictate whether a homebuyer moves forward with your home or decides to pursue other properties.

Allocate plenty of time and resources to enhance your home's curb appeal – you'll be glad you did. Completing home maintenance tasks like mowing the lawn and clearing exterior walkways may help your house stand out in a competitive real estate landscape.

Don't forget to declutter your home's interior as well. By doing so, you can make it simple for homebuyers to imagine what life would be like if they purchase your house.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

Becoming an expert home seller rarely, if ever, happens overnight. Instead, you may need additional help along the way.

Lucky for you, real estate agents are available to teach you about the intricacies of selling a home.

A real estate agent is happy to respond to your home selling concerns and queries at any time. He or she can offer guidance throughout the home selling journey and ensure you can get the best results possible.

When it comes to selling your home, it is important to do everything you can to optimize the value of your property. And with extra support from a real estate agent, you should have no trouble stirring up plenty of interest in your residence.

Use these tips, and you can become an expert home seller in no time at all.




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Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 2/10/2020


 Photo by Tayeb Mezahdia via Pixabay

When you start looking for your dream home, you need to know how much mortgage you will qualify for. Your real estate agent might ask you to get a pre-qualification letter. However, just because you are pre-qualified doesn’t mean that you will get the loan. You need a pre-approval for that, and even then, the mortgage company might not approve your application.

Pre-Qualification

A pre-qualification letter just tells you how much loan you can afford. The lender does not check your credit, your debt-to-income ratio or other factors before issuing a pre-qualification letter. Additionally, a pre-qualification letter is dependent on the information you provide to the lender. The pre-qualification essentially gives you an estimate of how much home you are able to afford so that you do not look at homes that are not within your range.

To get a pre-qualification, you supply the lender with your assets, debt and income. Because the lender bases its decision on the information you provide, rather than information from outside sources, a pre-qualification is not a guarantee that you will get the loan.

Pre-Approval

Getting pre-approved for a loan usually takes longer than getting pre-qualified. The lender pulls your credit report and might ask for additional documents, including tax records and bank statements. To get pre-approved, you must complete a loan application and provide your social security number. The lender might charge an application fee for a pre-approval.

With a pre-approval, you will have a closer interest rate assessment, that is usually not finalized until the loan goes through underwriting. Once the lender pre-approves you, it will send you a conditional commitment for the loan amount. You can look for homes at or below that price.

In a market when buyers bid against each other – a seller’s market – having a pre-approval letter might give you a step up with the seller, who will more likely choose an offer by someone more likely to get the loan. Thus, if you and someone else submit a bid on your dream home, but the other person only has a pre-qualification letter, the seller might accept your offer, even if it is not as good as the other buyer’s offer, simply because you are more likely to get the mortgage.

For a pre-approval, you will need to:

  • Complete the lender’s mortgage application;

  • Possibly pay an application fee;

  • Supply your social security number and allow the lender to pull your credit;

  • Provide financial information to help the lender make a decision; and

  • Tell the lender how much you plan to put up as a down payment.

After you are pre-approved and the seller accepts your offer, you will then have to provide the rest of the documentation to the lender, including the accepted offer, bank statements, retirement account statements, taxes for up to two years, proof of income and other documents that will help the lender come to a concrete decision.





Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 2/3/2020

Before you launch a home search, it helps to prepare for the property buying journey as much as possible. Fortunately, there are many things you can do to get ready to find your dream house.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you prep for a home search.

1. Establish Homebuying Criteria

If you know you want to buy a home, it generally is a good idea to define your ideal residence as well. That way, you can streamline your house search.

Consider where you want to reside. For example, if you work in the city, you may want to focus on houses in or near the city itself. On the other hand, if you plan to return to school, you may want to search for a home near top colleges and universities.

Think about what features you want in your ideal home, too. If you have always wanted to own a home that boasts a luxurious outdoor swimming pool, for instance, you can map out your home search accordingly. Or, if you want to purchase a residence that features a state-of-the-art kitchen, you can search for a home that offers this amenity.

2. Get Pre-Approved for a Mortgage

A mortgage typically is a must-have, regardless of where and when you search for a home. And if you enter the housing market with a mortgage at your disposal, you will know precisely how much you can spend on a residence.

Getting pre-approved for a mortgage can be simple. If you meet with banks and credit unions in your area, you can review your options and select a mortgage that complements your finances.

If you have concerns about home financing, don't hesitate to ask questions. Banks and credit unions employ courteous, diligent mortgage specialists who can respond to your home financing queries. As such, you can work with these specialists to gain the home financing insights you need to make the best-possible mortgage decision.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

As you get set to conduct a home search, there is no need to work alone. If you hire a real estate agent, you can collaborate with a homebuying expert who can take the guesswork out of finding and purchasing a house.

A real estate agent is happy to provide guidance throughout the homebuying journey. He or she can offer tips and recommendations to ensure you can find a terrific home at a price that matches your budget. Plus, a real estate agent will simplify the process of setting up home showings. Perhaps best of all, if you are uncertain about whether to submit an offer to purchase a home, a real estate agent is ready to provide insights to help you analyze all of your options.

Dedicate time and resources to prepare for the homebuying journey. By doing so, you can enter the housing market with the insights you need to succeed.





Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 1/27/2020


 Photo by Tumisu via Pixabay

Once you put down a good faith deposit and sign a purchase contract, you have the right to do due diligence, including getting various home inspections. You do have to pay for these inspections yourself unless you agree with the seller that the seller pays for the inspections. However, it is rare that a seller pays for inspections. These costs are also out-of-pocket costs. Before you go through with the purchase, you should do several inspections and other due diligence. It doesn’t matter in which order you do the inspections, but having a general inspection first could save you from paying for other inspections if the general inspection turns up a problem that is a deal-breaker.

General Inspection

When you hire a company for a general inspection, make sure the company is reputable and has good reviews. The inspector will look at the electrical, plumbing, the structure of the house, the attic and, if your house has a basement, which is extremely rare in Florida, the basement. The inspector also checks the crawlspace. They check for leaks and wood-destroying organisms. The inspector also checks for other minor imperfections, such as holes in screens. If the electric and water are not on, the inspector cannot check for electrical issues and plumbing leaks, including whether the HVAC system works.

For any defects that could be deal-breakers, get a quote on how much to repair the defect. You can offer to take care of the problem yourself in exchange for a discount on the price, or you could ask the seller to fix the problem. If the seller refuses either option, you can back out of the contract and get your good faith money back as long as a satisfactory inspection is an exception.

Termite Inspection

If the general inspector sees signs of termites, they will let you know and will advise that you get a termite inspection. Even if the general inspector does not see signs, you should get a termite inspection, as those inspectors are trained to locate wood-destroying organisms. If the termite inspector finds signs of termite or other wood-destroying organisms and you still want to buy the house, get a quote from the inspector or another company for the cost of repairing the damage and tenting the house. Again, if the seller doesn’t want to cover the cost of the repairs and the eradication of the bugs, you can back out of the contract and get your good faith money back as long as you have the exception for passing a termite inspection in the purchase contract.

Additional Due Diligence

After doing the appropriate inspections and amending the purchase contract — if needed — you should have a surveyor survey the property to ensure the boundary lines are where the seller said they are. Your loan company will also require an appraisal, though the loan company will pick the appraiser. If the survey does not match fencing or other markers, make sure there are no objections with the neighbors for the surveyor to move the markers for the neighbors to move their fence.

If the appraisal is not satisfactory, your lender might ask for additional money down or might deny the loan. You might be able to get your good faith money back if you cannot get the loan.





Posted by Annemarie Torcivia on 1/13/2020

Getting a professional inspection is one of the most important parts of closing on a home. An inspection can save you endless time and money if it catches repairs that need to be made, and it can draw your attention to any problems that could be dangerous to you and your family.

Many buyers, especially those who are buying a home for the first time, aren’t sure what to expect during a home inspection. They might have questions that they’re afraid to ask the inspector, or they might feel like they should be asking questions but don’t know the right ones to ask.

In this article, we’ll give you the rundown on the home inspection process. We’ll explain how to get started, what to expect on inspection day, and what to do with your findings.

Contingency clauses

Before closing on a home, it’s important to make sure your offer involves a contingency clause, otherwise known as a “due diligence contingency.” This section of your contract gives you the right to perform a home inspection within a given number of days.

Sellers may inform you that they have recently had the home inspected and even offer to show you the results of the inspection. However, it is best practice to have your own inspection performed with a trusted professional.

After your offer is accepted, you should begin calling and getting quotes from inspectors immediately.

Before the inspection

Once you’ve considered your options of inspectors and chosen an inspector, it’s time to schedule your inspection. Both you and your real estate agent should attend the inspection.

You’ll both have the opportunity to ask questions. However, it’s a good idea to write down your minor questions and ask them before or after the inspection so that the professional you’ve hired is able to focus on their work to do the best possible job inspecting your future home.

During the inspection

The inspection itself is pretty straightforward. Your inspector will examine the exterior and interior of your home, including several vital components and then will provide you with a report of their findings.

They will inform you of repairs that need to be made now, parts of the home that should be monitored for future repairs, and anything that poses a safety concern to you and your family.

The parts of your home the inspector will review include:

  • Roof

  • Exterior Walls

  • Foundation

  • Garage

  • Land grading

  • Plumbing

  • Electrical

  • Heating, ventilation, air conditioning

  • Appliances

There are some things your inspection won’t include. For example, mold, termite damage, and other issues that aren’t easily observable without causing damage might be missed by your inspector and will require a specialist.

After the inspection

Once the inspection is complete, you will have the chance to ask any remaining questions. You can review the findings of your inspection report and make decisions about how you want to handle any repairs that need to be made.

You may choose to ask the seller to make the repairs noted in your inspection report. If they refuse, you can withdraw from your contract at any time.


Ultimately, the choice will be yours what to do with the findings from the inspection. But having one can save you immeasurable money on impending repairs that you may not have been aware of.




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